Women’s History Weekly Digest

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5 Things You May Not Know About the Seneca Falls Convention

Shared by Peggy Layne

huffingtonpost.com - July 19-20 marks the anniversary of the Women's Rights Convention, a.k.a., the Seneca Falls Convention. This two-day convention held in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848 is hailed as the first women's...

Ida B. Wells: Nothing Stopped Her from Exposing the Truth

aauw.org - In recognition of Black History Month, AAUW is profiling women we should never forget who fought to break through barriers. This week we feature Ida Bell Wells (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931), who...

Google Pays Tribute To Ida B. Wells, Fearless Journalist And All-Round Badass

Shared by Donna DeCaul

huffingtonpost.com - When Ida B. Wells was 22, she was asked by a conductor of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Company to give up her seat on the train to a white man. She refused, and the conductor attempted to forcibl...

From Seneca Falls to Winston-Salem, the Fight for Voting Rights Continues

lwv.org - One-hundred sixty-seven years ago next week, on July 19-20 1848, 300 women and men met in Seneca Falls, New York, to discuss "the social, civil and religious condition and rights of Woman." The Sen...

Mixed Race Irish: ‘We were the dust to be swept away’

Shared by Itha O'Neill

irishtimes.com - In October 1958, when Rosemary Adaser was admitted, as an 18-month-old, to a mother-and-baby home in Dublin, her admission notes described her as “illegitimate and coloured”. Fifteen years later, w...

Cathay Williams, AKA William Cathay, American Civil War soldier - Amazing Women In History

amazingwomeninhistory.com - Cathay Williams (1844 – 1892), a.k.a. William Cathay, was the first known African American woman to enlist in the United States Army, and the only black woman documented to serve in the US army in ...

Steinem and Mankiller School for Organizers

womensmediacenter.com - It was a collision of worlds: on-the-ground activists from across the country and archivist/academics in the same space for four days. It was an exploratory group brought together to help shape the...

Women's Museum of Ireland | Articles

Shared by Zoë C

womensmuseumofireland.ie - Margaret O’Carroll of Eile, County Offaly was born in the early fifteenth century, a medieval queen in a time of war and conquest. Her deeds are recorded in both the Annals of Connacht and the Anna...

In Memoriam: Lois Green Carr, 1922-2015

earlyamericanists.com - Lois Green Carr was a pioneer in both social history and women’s history. Originally from an upper-class family from Massachusetts, Carr made her greatest impact in studying the history of women fr...

Alaska P. Davidson, the FBI’s first female Special Agent - Amazing Women In History

amazingwomeninhistory.com - Alaska Packard Davidson (1868–1934) became the first female Special Agent in 1922, at the age of 54. She only served for two years before being asked to resign by newly-appointed Director J. Edgar ...

Meerabai the Poet - Amazing Women In History

amazingwomeninhistory.com - That dark dweller in Braj Is my only refuge. O my companion, worldly comfort is an illusion, As soon you get it, it goes. I have chosen the indestructible for my refuge, Him whom the snake of death...

Ella Baker, civil & human rights activist - Amazing Women In History

amazingwomeninhistory.com - Ella Josephine Baker (1903–1986) was an African American civil rights and human rights activist whose career spanned over five decades. Ella worked with some of the most famous civil rights leaders...

Ana Nzinga Mbande, fearless African queen - Amazing Women In History

Shared by Historyboobs

amazingwomeninhistory.com - Queen Nzinga Mbande was a ruthless and powerful 17th century African ruler of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms (modern-day Angola). Nzinga fearlessly and cleverly fought for the freedom and stature ...

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, self-taught scholar and poet of New Spain - Amazing Women In History

amazingwomeninhistory.com - Born in New Spain (now Mexico) in 1651, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz was a nun who wrote what is considered the first feminist manifesto. She was revered as a prodigy during her lifetime, and was one ...

Cwenthryth of Mercia

thefreelancehistorywriter.com - For those who have watched the television series “Vikings”, you will recall there is an ambitious and malicious character named Cwenthryth of Mercia. There is a scene on the show where Cwenthryth s...

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

smithsonianmag.com - In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had do...

How Ida B. Wells became a trailblazing journalist

vox.com - Ida B. Wells was a groundbreaking journalist, an activist, a co-founder of the NAACP, and even a precursor to Rosa Parks — it's difficult to choose which occupation defines her legacy best. She was...

110-year-old vet meets Obama in whirlwind day in D.C.

Shared by Ginnette

usatoday.com - President Obama chatted with the oldest living US veteran in the White House Friday afternoon. Emma Didlake is 110 years old. (July 17) AP WASHINGTON — For her big day in the nation's capital Frida...

"I would appreciate if you could call me Dr. Ruth Howard"

centerhistorypsychology.wordpress.com - The Cummings Center’s second installment of the 5 Minute History Lesson focuses on the life and career of Dr. Ruth Winifred Howard (1900-1997). Dr. Robert V. Guthrie‘s (1976) Even the Rat Was White...

Remembering the fight for women’s rights: Suffragists at Seneca Falls laid groundwork for others in the struggle for equality - The Buffalo News

Shared by TPSM

buffalonews.com - Every July, men and women of all ages and colors come together at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls to celebrate the courage and passion of the leaders who started the wom...

There Once was a 17 Year Old Girl Who Struck Out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig Back to Back

todayifoundout.com - Today I found out there once was a girl who struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in succession. What’s even more impressive about that was neither Ruth nor Gehrig managed to even get the bat on the ...

Putting History Into Action: Gloria & Wilma School Links Activists and Archives « - Smith College Grécourt Gate Smith College Grécourt Gate

smith.edu - The activists gathered at the Smith College Conference Center in June were tackling a seldom-asked question: How can history support the day-to-day work of women organizers? Linda Burnham, research...

Margaret K. Hofer Named VP and Museum Director at the New-York Historical Society - In The News

finebooksmagazine.com - Ms. Hofer stated, “It has been an adventure working with one of finest holdings of decorative arts and historical artifacts in the United States, including a stellar collection of early American si...

The Whitney Embraces Dancenoise, a Brash ’80s Performance Duo

nytimes.com - Combat boots and nudity, fake blood and a barrage of props. Dancenoise was feminism and showbiz rolled into one. The brash and transgressive post-punk performance duo of Anne Iobst and Lucy Sexton ...

Katharine McCormick, biologist & millionaire philanthropist - Amazing Women In History

amazingwomeninhistory.com - Katharine Dexter McCormick is a name that every woman today should know, because your life would probably be very different today if it wasn’t for her. Katharine funded what The New York Times call...

U.S. Treasurer Rosie Rios: 'What took all of us so long' to discuss great American women on new $10 bill? - Washington Business Journal

Shared by TPSM

bizjournals.com - Ultimately, the decision is up to Lew, who visited the bureau last week and talked to other tour groups. Rios said Lew is the first treasury secretary to do that . “This isn’t about winners or lose...

Chick History

Chick History is a place to come together and (re)learn about all the cool things chicks have done that, like the dishes, otherwise might go unnoticed.

Editor's note

The Women’s History Weekly Digest is an e-newspaper published every Thursday. Content is from twitter contributors all over the world – from all time periods – using the #wmnhist hastag in their tweets with links. Find out the latest on Women’s History by subscribing to the newspaper. Want to contribute? Use #wmnhist in your tweets with links about Women’s History and your tweet will automatically be pulled into the weekly digest. It’s that easy!
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